Crabwood Hardwood Lumber

Crabwood resembles a plain mahogany and some grades of cedar in color, general appearance, and technical properties, but is lacks the high luster and attractive figure present in better grades of mahogany.

Crabwood Hardwood Lumber

crabwood

Crabwood

Scientific Name: Caropa Guianensis ­ (Family: Meliaceae)
A.T.I.B.T. Standard Name: Andiroba
Other Names: - Krapa, Guino, Figueroa, Tangare, Carapa, Crappo

Crabwood is a member of the mahogany family and resembles the true mahoganies, sometimes being substituted for them.

THE TREE

The trees are evergreen, straight, of good form, and commonly 2 to 3 feet in diameter and 80-100 feet in height. Boles are clear of branches 30-90 feet in length.

WOOD APPEARANCE

Crabwood resembles a plain mahogany and some grades of cedar in color, general appearance, and technical properties, but is lacks the high luster and attractive figure present in better grades of mahogany. The heartwood is a light salmon or pale pink to reddish brown when freshly cut, becoming reddish brown to brown when dry. The general color is somewhat darker than mahogany because of the accumulated dark-colored gum in the vessels. The sapwood is pinkish when freshly cut, turning pale brown or grayish when dry. The wood varies from coarse to fine but is mostly medium in texture. The grain is usually straight, but interlocked grain and occasionally fiddleback mottle occurs in larger logs.

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

The wood is moderately hard with good mechanical properties and is fairly stable in use. Crabwood is comparable to teak in fire resistance and comparable to mahogany in weathering properties; it rates good in both respects.

Weight: In the green condition the timber weighs 56 lbs/ft3, and about 39 lbs/ft3 (610 kg/m3) when air-dry.

Specific Gravity: Air-dry wood averages about .64 based on air-dry volume and weight, and averages .56 based on green volume and oven-dry weight.

NATURAL DURABILITY

The heartwood is moderately durable and fire resistant. Logs are liable to attack by ambrosia (pinhole-borer) beetles.

TIMBER PROCESSING

Seasoning: Crabwood is moderately difficult to air-season with only moderate checking and slight warping. Kiln Schedule C.

Working/Machining: Crabwood can be worked quite easily with machines and hand tools. The wood has good machining properties in planing, molding, turning, mortising, sanding, and boring.

Assembly: Glues and holds nails well. Tendency to split on nailing.

Finishing: Finishes smoothly. Takes stain and polishes satisfactorily.

USES

Crabwood is suitable for general carpentry, furniture, cabinet work, shingles, millwork, interior trim, boxes, crates, flooring, masts, turnery, and interior joinery. Crabwood has been recommended as a substitute for black walnut and black cherry.

SUPPLIES

Occurs in reasonable quantities. Regular supplies available.